GET TAX HELP (800) 536-0734

Ask Phil: IRS Audits

Today, Optima Tax Relief’s Lead Tax Attorney, Phil Hwang, discusses his 5 top tips for how to avoid an IRS audit. 

File Your Taxes: Some taxpayers don’t file because they think they don’t have to. The minimum requirement to file a tax return depends on your filing status and income, but generally most U.S. citizens and permanent residents need to file. Remember, if you don’t file when you’re required to, you will be hit with IRS penalties and interest. The IRS could also file a tax return on your behalf. While this might sound like a burden lifted off your own shoulders, this could be much worse than filing yourself because it can result in owing more taxes. You can use the IRS’s online Interactive Tax Assistant to find out if you need to file a tax return. 

Report All Your Income: Failing to report all your income is the quickest way to being audited by the IRS. Keep in mind that the IRS receives copies of every W-2, 1099, and other tax forms that you receive. They know exactly how much you earned in the previous year and if your reported income does not match what they have on file, you’re much more likely to be audited.  

Use Common Sense with Business Expenses: This tip is for the self-employed filers. The IRS requires all business expenses to be ordinary and necessary to be deductible during tax time. This means it should be common for your industry and necessary for the production of income. Excessive meals and entertainment, trips taken for non-business purposes, and commuting costs are examples of nondeductible business expenses. 

Keep Good Records of Income and Expenses: Keeping good records of income and expenses can not only help you monitor the progress and financial well-being of your business, but also keep track of your deductible expenses, prepare your tax returns, and substantiate claims made on your tax returns. The IRS recommends keeping returns, records, and other tax documents for at least three years. 

Be Wary of Multi-Year Losses: If your business consistently reports losses during tax time, the IRS will likely audit you. In addition, the IRS only allows you to write off losses for three of the five previous tax years. If you can’t prove your business is beginning to turn a profit, even a small one, the IRS can categorize your business as a hobby, at which point you will be unable to deduct any of your expenses. 

Tune in next Friday for another episode of “Ask Phil” where Phil will review common IRS tax forms. 

If You Think You’re at Risk of Being Audited by the IRS, Contact Us Today for a Free Consultation