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Ask Phil: Maximizing Tax Deductions

Today, Optima Tax Relief’s Lead Tax Attorney, Phil Hwang, discusses maximizing tax deductions. 

Everyone wants a big refund. So, how do we know we’re maximizing our deductions to accomplish this? It depends on whether you choose to take the standard deduction or itemize your deductions. Most taxpayers find it more financially rewarding to take the standard deduction. In addition, itemizing deductions can be tedious work and meticulous expense tracking throughout the year. If you itemize, you can deduct expenses like: 

  • Charitable deductions 
  • State taxes paid 
  • Mortgage interest 
  • Property taxes paid 
  • Some medical and dental expenses  

How do you know which option of maximizing your tax deductions is best for you? It depends on how many deductible expenses you had for the year, as well as the standard deduction amount for your filing status. In 2023, the standard deductions are: 

  • $13,850 for single filers and married couples filing separately 
  • $20,800 for heads of household 
  • $27,700 for married couples filing jointly and surviving spouses 

You can fill out a Schedule A on Form 1040 to see the total amount of itemized deductions you have for the year. If your itemized deductions do not exceed the standard deduction for your filing status, you should take the standard deduction as it will result in a lower taxable income.  

Next week, Phil will discuss an important update about IRS revenue officers. See you next Friday! 

If You Want to Maximize Your Deductions, Contact Us Today for a Free Consultation 

An Overview of Property Taxes

an overview of property taxes

Property taxes are paid on property owned, either by an individual or a legal entity. How much property tax you are required to pay is determined by the local government where the property is located. Typically, the assessed taxes are used to fund things like water and sewer improvements, education, road construction, and public services like law enforcement and fire protection. Here is a brief overview of property taxes and what they mean for your taxes. 

How is property tax calculated? 

The amount of property tax you are required to pay depends on the value of your property. This includes the land, buildings sitting on it, your assessed property value, and the county’s projected mill tax. A mill tax rate is the sum of all tax rates levied on your property value.  

The mill tax is multiplied by the property value to calculate your assessed value of your property. This is then used to find the fair market value of your property. This figure is multiplied by an assessment rate to calculate your tax bill.  

Your property tax bill may be higher or lower than your neighbor’s. One example is if your plot of land is larger. Another is if your home’s assessed value is higher. In some rare cases, your neighbor’s property may fall in a different jurisdiction with a lower mill tax rate, resulting in a smaller tax bill.  

Who must pay property taxes? 

Typically, most owners of property must pay property taxes, whether they are an individual or legal entity. However, there are some groups or property types that are exempt. These include senior citizens, those with disabilities, and military veterans. Additionally, there is a homestead exemption that reduced property tax bills. The rules for exemption vary by state or municipality so it’s best to check with your local and state government. Also note that the agencies that collect property taxes will not always notify you if you do qualify for an exemption and you may need to apply for it on your own.  

What happens if I do not pay property taxes? 

Put simply, failing to pay property taxes can result in a lien on your home. A lien is a legal claim against your property that can be used as collateral to repay the debt owed. If you still do not pay off the balance, the taxing authority can legally sell your home, or sell the tax lien. In this case, the purchaser of the lien can have your home foreclosed or use other methods to obtain the deed to your property. The consequences vary by state.  

Tax Relief for Homeowners 

It goes without saying that all property owners should stay on top of their property tax bills. Homeowners who itemize their deductions can deduct property taxes paid on a primary residence and any other real estate owned. You can deduct up to $10,000 in state and local income taxes, which includes property taxes. Optima Tax Relief is the nation’s leading tax resolution firm with over $1 billion in resolved tax liabilities.  

If You Need Tax Help, Contact Us Today for a Free Consultation